Baltimore, MD Lithotripsy (Kidney Stone Removal) Cost Comparison

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A Lithotripsy (Kidney Stone Removal) in Baltimore costs $6,666 on average when you take the median of the 85 medical providers who perform Lithotripsy (Kidney Stone Removal) procedures in Baltimore, MD. There are 1 different types of Lithotripsy (Kidney Stone Removal) provided in Baltimore, listed below, and the price for each differs based upon your insurance type. As a healthcare consumer you should understand that prices of medical procedures vary and if you shop from the Baltimore providers below you may be able to save money. Start shopping today and see what you can save!
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Select any of the procedures below to view detailed cost data and provider comparisons.

Procedure Price Range
Lithotripsy (Kidney Stone Removal Surgery) Cost Average $4,200 - $11,300 Free Quote

Compare Lithotripsy (Kidney Stone Removal) Providers in Baltimore, MD

Facility City Type
Downtown Baltimore Surgery Center Baltimore Ambulatory Surgical Center
Summit Ambulatory Surgical Center (Sister Pierre) Towson Ambulatory Surgical Center
Piney Orchard Surgery Center. Odenton Ambulatory Surgical Center
Ruxton Surgicenter Towson Ambulatory Surgical Center
Mercy Medical Center Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
Harford Memorial Hospital Havre De Grace Acute Care Hospital
Ums Chesapeake Lithotripsy Baltimore Lithotripsy Surgery Center
Wyman Park ASC Series Baltimore Ambulatory Surgical Center
Greater Baltimore Medical Center Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
Maryland Surgicenter Hunt Valley Ambulatory Surgical Center
Bel Air Ambulatory Surgical Centers Bel Air Ambulatory Surgical Center
Baltimore Ambulatory Center Baltimore Ambulatory Surgical Center
Kernan Hospital Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
Bon Secours Hospital Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
Hanover Parkway Surgery Center Woodbine Ambulatory Surgical Center
Maryland Surgeons Center of Columbia Columbia Ambulatory Surgical Center
Carroll Hospital Center Westminster Acute Care Hospital
Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
Plaza Ambulatory Surgical Center Baltimore Ambulatory Surgical Center
Annapolis Surgery Center Annapolis Ambulatory Surgical Center
Surgical Specialty Suites Lutherville Ambulatory Surgical Center
Summit Ambulatory Surgical Center (Good Samaritan Hospital) Baltimore Ambulatory Surgical Center
Saint Joseph Medical Center Towson Acute Care Hospital
White Marsh Surgery Center Series Nottingham Ambulatory Surgical Center
Harford County Ambulatory Surgery Center Edgewood Ambulatory Surgical Center
Reisterstown Ambulatory Surgical Center Reisterstown Ambulatory Surgical Center
Carroll Hospital Center, the Ambulatory Care Center Westminster Ambulatory Surgical Center
Maritime Lithotripsy Reisterstown Lithotripsy Surgery Center
Summit Ambulatory Surgical Center (Bellona) Towson Ambulatory Surgical Center
Summit Ambulatory Surgical Center ( Baltimore Ambulatory Surgical Center
Summit Ambulatory Surgical Center (The Continence Center) Owings Mills Ambulatory Surgical Center
The Surgical Center of Greater Annapolis Arnold Ambulatory Surgical Center
Greenspring Surgery Center Baltimore Ambulatory Surgical Center
Saint Agnes Hospital Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
Surgcenter of Glen Burnie Glen Burnie Ambulatory Surgical Center
Sinai Hospital Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
George T. Grace, M.d. Surgery Center Baltimore Ambulatory Surgical Center
Towson Surgical Center Towson Ambulatory Surgical Center
West Annapolis Ambulatory Surgical Center Annapolis Ambulatory Surgical Center
Anne Arundel Medical Center Annapolis Acute Care Hospital
Columbia Urological Surgery Center Columbia Lithotripsy Surgery Center
Ellicott City Surgery Center Ellicott City Ambulatory Surgical Center
Maryland General Hospital Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
Summit Ambulatory Surgical Center (Glen Burnie) Glen Burnie Ambulatory Surgical Center
Bay Surgery Centers Annapolis Ambulatory Surgical Center
Howard County General Hospital Columbia Acute Care Hospital
Northwest Hospital Center Randallstown Acute Care Hospital
South River Ambulatory Surgery Center Edgewater Ambulatory Surgical Center
Laurel Ambulatory Surgical Center Gambrills Ambulatory Surgical Center
Lacher Ambulatory Surgical Center Towson Ambulatory Surgical Center
Harbor Hospital Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
Chesapeake Ambulatory Surgery Center Pasadena Ambulatory Surgical Center
Security Ambulatory Surgicenter Baltimore Ambulatory Surgical Center
Surgicenter at Pasadena Pasadena Ambulatory Surgical Center
Bel Air Ambulatory Surgical Center Forest Hill Ambulatory Surgical Center
Advance Surgery Center Annapolis Ambulatory Surgical Center
Summit Ambulatory Surgical Center (Pine Heights) Baltimore Ambulatory Surgical Center
Mid-atlantic Mobile Lithotripsy Greenbelt Lithotripsy Surgery Center
Greater Chesapeake Surgery Center Lutherville Ambulatory Surgical Center
Box Hill Surgery Center Abingdon Ambulatory Surgical Center
Union Memorial Hospital Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
University of Maryland Medical Center Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
Anne Arundel Urological Surgery Center Annapolis Lithotripsy Surgery Center
Summit Ambulatory Surgical Center (Bel Air) Bel Air Ambulatory Surgical Center
Westminster Surgery Center Westminster Ambulatory Surgical Center
Lutherville Surgicenter Lutherville Ambulatory Surgical Center
Franklin Square Hospital Center Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
Rotunda Ambulatory Surgery Center Reisterstown Ambulatory Surgical Center
Riva Road Surgical Center Annapolis Ambulatory Surgical Center
Baltimore Washington Medical Center Glen Burnie Acute Care Hospital
Summit Ambulatory Surgical Center (Union Memorial Hospital) Baltimore Ambulatory Surgical Center
Surgicenter of Baltimore Owings Mills Ambulatory Surgical Center
Summit Ambulatory Surgical Center (North Charles) Baltimore Ambulatory Surgical Center
Snowden River Surgery Center Ellicott City Ambulatory Surgical Center
Upper Chesapeake Medical Center Bel Air Acute Care Hospital
Mid Atlantic Surgery Pavilion Aberdeen Ambulatory Surgical Center
Carroll Footworks Surgery Center Eldersburg Ambulatory Surgical Center
River Reach Outpatient Surgery Center Severna Park Ambulatory Surgical Center
The Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
Baltimore-harford Surgical Centers Towson Ambulatory Surgical Center
Slade ASC Owings Mills Ambulatory Surgical Center
Good Samaritan Hospital Baltimore Acute Care Hospital
York Green Surgery Center Lutherville Ambulatory Surgical Center
Summit Ambulatory Surgical Center (Franklin Square) Baltimore Ambulatory Surgical Center
Lisa Renfro Surgery Center Annapolis Ambulatory Surgical Center

Lithotripsy (Kidney Stone) Surgery Introduction

The most common method of Kidney Stone Surgery Removal involves sending the shock waves through padded cushions on the table. An older and less commonly used method involves the patient being placed in a tub of water, with shock waves sent through the water. This usually requires general anesthesia (asleep, no pain), but you may go home the same day. While the vast majority of kidney stones are treated with ESWL, not all stones can be treated this way. Sometimes a laser is used if ESWL is not effective or you cannot have ESWL for some reason. When a laser is used, the doctor must use an endoscope, which is a tube introduced into the body, via the urinary tract, to get close to the stone. In the case of large kidney stones, the doctor may also access the stones from your back into your kidney, through a procedure called percutaneous lithotripsy. This method requires a hospital stay. Your doctor will decide which type of surgery is best for you.

Kidney Stone Surgery Patient Preparation

A complete physical examination is done, along with diagnostic tests and a test to determine the number, location, and size of the stone or stones. This test is called an intravenous pyelogram, or IVP. It is particularly important to inform the physician of all medications or vitamins taken regularly or if you are pregnant (or think you might be pregnant) or if you have heart, lung or other medical conditions that may need special attention, and, finally, if you have a history of bleeding disorders or if you are taking any anticoagulant (blood-thinning) medications, aspirin, or other medications that affect blood clotting. You will be given instructions in advance that will outline what you should and should not do in preparation for the surgery; be sure to read and follow those instructions. You will be asked to fast for eight hours before the procedure, generally after midnight. Arrangements may need to be made for transportation after the surgery is complete. If you are given a prescription for pain medication, have it filled prior to surgery.

What to expect during and after Kidney Stone Surgery (Lithotripsy)

The procedure is generally performed on an outpatient basis and takes from 45 minutes to 1 hour. You will lie down on an exam table on top of a soft, water-filled cushion. Since lithotripsy can cause mild discomfort, you will be given a mild sedative or painkiller before the procedure starts. The stones are located using x-ray or ultrasound equipment and then high-energy shock waves, also called sound waves, pass through your body to the area on the kidney stones. When this starts, you may feel a tapping sensation on your skin. The procedure is continued until the waves break the stones into tiny pieces. A stent may be placed in the ureter to help the stone fragments (gravel) pass.

After surgery, you will be taken to the recovery room for observation. Once your blood pressure, pulse, and breathing are stable and you are alert, you will most often be discharged to your home. If you had percutaneous lithotripsy, you will need to stay in the hospital overnight. Before being discharged, you will be given instructions about care for your incisions, limits on activities and what you should do to aid your recovery. Extra fluids will be stressed. Most patients have a lot of blood in their urine after the ESWL procedure. This is normal and should clear after several days to a week or so. Your physician may give you additional or alternate instructions, depending on your particular situation. Notify your physician to report any of the following: fever and/or chills; burning with urination; urinary frequency or urgency; or lower back pain.

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