Oakland, CA Arthroscopic Knee Surgery Cost Comparison

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An Arthroscopic Knee Surgery in Oakland costs $6,162 on average when you take the median of the 59 medical providers who perform Arthroscopic Knee Surgery procedures in Oakland, CA. There are 1 different types of Arthroscopic Knee Surgery provided in Oakland, listed below, and the price for each differs based upon your insurance type. As a healthcare consumer you should understand that prices of medical procedures vary and if you shop from the Oakland providers below you may be able to save money. Start shopping today and see what you can save!
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Select any of the procedures below to view detailed cost data and provider comparisons.

Procedure Price Range
Knee Repair Surgery Cost Average $3,800 - $10,500 Free Quote

Compare Arthroscopic Knee Surgery Providers in Oakland, CA

Facility City Type
Peninsula Medical Center Burlingame Acute Care Hospital
San Ramon Regional Medical Center San Ramon Acute Care Hospital
Brentwood Surgery Center Brentwood Ambulatory Surgical Center
California Pacific Medical Center - Pacific Campus San Francisco Acute Care Hospital
East Bay Medical Surgical Center Castro Valley Ambulatory Surgical Center
Trivalley Outpatient Surgery Center Pleasanton Ambulatory Surgical Center
Sequoia Surgical Pavilion Walnut Creek Ambulatory Surgical Center
Walnut Creek Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Walnut Creek Ortho Surgery Center
Mt. Diablo Surgery Center Concord Ambulatory Surgical Center
Tresanti Medical Corporation San Ramon Ambulatory Surgical Center
Burlingame Orthopedics Burlingame Ortho Surgery Center
Pleasanton Surgery Center Pleasanton Ambulatory Surgical Center
Washington Outpatient Surgery Center Fremont Ambulatory Surgical Center
Kaiser Permanente Walnut Creek Medical Center Walnut Creek Acute Care Hospital
Fremont Ambulatory Surgery Center Fremont Ambulatory Surgical Center
Kaiser Permanente Hayward Medical Center Hayward Acute Care Hospital
Ak Surgery Center San Leandro Ambulatory Surgical Center
Omni Surgicenter Fremont Ambulatory Surgical Center
Surgecenter of Palo Alto Fremont Ambulatory Surgical Center
Vista Surgery Center San Francisco Ambulatory Surgical Center
Kaiser Permanente Redwood City Medical Center Redwood City Acute Care Hospital
North Bay Regional Surgery Center Novato Ambulatory Surgical Center
San Ramon Surgery Center San Ramon Ambulatory Surgical Center
Valley Memorial Center Livermore Acute Care Hospital
California Sports and Orthopaedic Institute Berkeley Ortho Surgery Center
Kaiser Permanente San Francisco Medical Center San Francisco Acute Care Hospital
Pacific Heights Surgery Center San Francisco Ambulatory Surgical Center
Laurel Grove Hospital Castro Valley Acute Care Hospital
Abj Surgery Center San Mateo Ambulatory Surgical Center
Post Street Surgery Center San Francisco Ambulatory Surgical Center
Peninsula Procedure Center Redwood City Ambulatory Surgical Center
Bayspine Surgery Center Richmond Ambulatory Surgical Center
Aspen Surgery Center Walnut Creek Ambulatory Surgical Center
Canyon Pinole Surgery Center Pinole Ambulatory Surgical Center
Marin General Hospital Greenbrae Acute Care Hospital
Pacific Surgery Center Corte Madera Ambulatory Surgical Center
Seton Medical Center Daly City Acute Care Hospital
Blackhawk Surgery Center, A Medical Corp. Danville Ambulatory Surgical Center
Surgical Suite San Francisco Ambulatory Surgical Center
San Leandro Surgery Center San Leandro Ambulatory Surgical Center
Greenbrae Surgery Center Greenbrae Ambulatory Surgical Center
Shadelands Surgery Center Walnut Creek Ambulatory Surgical Center
Doctors Medical Center - San Pablo Campus San Pablo Acute Care Hospital
Willow Surgery Center San Francisco Ambulatory Surgical Center
Sequoia Hospital Redwood City Acute Care Hospital
Menlo Park Surgical Hospital Menlo Park Acute Care Hospital
Webster Surgery Center Oakland Ambulatory Surgical Center
Bay Surgery Center Oakland Ambulatory Surgical Center
Physicians Surgery Center Daly City Ambulatory Surgical Center
Presidio Surgery Center San Francisco Ambulatory Surgical Center
Premier Surgery Center Concord Ambulatory Surgical Center
Novato Community Hospital Novato Acute Care Hospital
Marin Specialty Surgery Center Greenbrae Ambulatory Surgical Center
Hacienda Surgery Center Pleasanton Ambulatory Surgical Center
San Mateo Surgery Center San Mateo Ambulatory Surgical Center
Kaiser Permanente San Rafael Medical Center San Rafael Acute Care Hospital
Mt Tam Orthopedics Larkspur Ortho Surgery Center
Kaiser Permanente South San Francisco Medical Center South San Francisco Acute Care Hospital
California Pacific Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine San Francisco Ortho Surgery Center

Arthroscopic Knee Surgery Cost and Procedure Introduction

Arthroscopic knee surgery is an arthroscopic procedure performed through small incisions, using an instrument called an arthroscope. The arthroscope (or “scope”) is a tube that contains a camera and other surgical instruments. Surgeons use this procedure to diagnose and treat knee problems such as torn meniscus, misaligned kneecap (patella) or torn ligaments. Arthroscopic knee surgeries are performed in a hospital or outpatient surgical facility by an orthopedic surgeon. Patients are usually able to come home the day of the surgery, typically one to two hours after the procedure. Most patients can resume normal activities after the surgery, though the timeline varies greatly depending on the severity of the issue.

Patient Preparation for Arthroscopic Knee Surgery

A physical examination will be performed along with blood or other diagnostic tests, such as X-rays and MRIs. It is particularly important to inform the physician of all medications or vitamins taken regularly or if you are pregnant (or think you might be pregnant). Tell your doctor if you have heart, lung or other medical conditions that may need special attention and, finally, if you have a history of bleeding disorders or if you are taking any anticoagulant (blood-thinning) medications, aspirin or other medications that affect blood clotting. You will be given instructions in advance that will outline what you should and should not do in preparation for the surgery; be sure to read and follow those instructions. You will be asked to fast for eight hours before the procedure, generally after midnight. You will need to make arrangements for transportation after the surgery is complete. If you are given a prescription for pain medication, have it filled prior to surgery.

What to Expect During and After Arthroscopic Knee Surgery

The surgery itself usually takes less than an hour, though it could take longer and depends of the severity of the problem. The preparation and recovery time may take several hours. An intravenous line is inserted into the arm to administer a sedative and a painkiller. Your heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate and oxygen level will be monitored during the procedure. In most cases, the procedure is done while you are under general anesthesia (unconscious and pain-free), though local or regional anesthetics are sometimes used. Typically, arthroscopic surgery is performed by an orthopedic surgeon, who will make a few small incisions around the kneecap. After inserting the arthroscope, the surgeon will locate the problem via a monitor attached to the camera in the scope. The surgeon will then correct the issue using the surgical tools contained in the arthroscope. After incisions are closed — using a stitch or steri-strip — your knee will be wrapped in a soft bandage.

After surgery, you will be taken to the recovery room for observation. Once your blood pressure, pulse and breathing are stable and you are alert, you will be discharged to your home. Before being discharged, you will be given instructions about care for your incisions, limits on activities and what you should do to aid your recovery. If you notice any of the following, call the number the hospital gave you: Fever, excessive sweating, difficulty urinating, redness, bleeding or worsening pain.

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